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Preparing Yourself Practically

Select your primary support person. Choose someone you feel close to who has the time, health, and flexibility to be your caregiver. You need to know you are a not a burden to this person.
  • Prepare a phone/email tree. This will make it easier for your caregiver to update friends and family and cut down on phone or email volume.
  • Organize your personal affairs. Consider filling out an advanced directive, writing a will, and sharing access to bank accounts, email, or blogs. You may also need to fill out Family Medical Leave Act, insurance, or loan deferment paperwork.
  • Consider dependent care. Find someone you trust and set up a plan to take care of your children and/or pets. Ask your doctor when you can expect to see your children and pets after your transplant.
  • Arrange transportation. When you are on the organ waiting list, your first responsibility is to plan how to get to the transplant center quickly when you get the call that an organ is available. Make arrangements well in advance. Plan the driving route and think about traffic conditions. If you are relocating, make housing arrangements in advance.
  • Pack your bags. You'll need to be ready to leave as soon as you get the call that an organ is available. Include insurance information, a list of medications, an extra 24-hour supply of medication, and other necessities.



This Web site is intended solely for the purpose of electronically providing the public with general health-related information and convenient access to the data resources. UNOS is not affiliated with any one product nor does UNOS assume responsibility for any error, omissions or other discrepancies.

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